PDA

View Full Version : West vs East vs Mex????


bullfrog100000
02-03-2008, 02:02 PM
Looking for a good link, or just some input from you all, as to the differences in the Hognose species.

Specifically I've heard some prefer toads for food... I want one who like mice/rats.

What are the sizes? I get varying info... some say 2 ft or less even for females, but then I see some on here that are 3 ft. ????

Personality? Day or Night snakes?

Will they like an aquarium set up or do they want a rack system like the Ball Pythons?

Thanks so much for any info...

jamay
02-03-2008, 06:38 PM
I only know about the western hognose, and I'm not sure what all varies between the other species. Typically, the males reach around 15" and females around 26". They are excellent eaters and take down mice without any problems. Their personalities are the best feature of this particular snake. They are very calm and curious. Sometimes they hiss and flatten their heads, but it's all a bluff. Once in hand, they quickly become your favorite snake. Also, they are diurnal, active during the day and taking cover at night. A lot of the time my female will sit at the front of her viv, completely uncovered and watch me. I don't think you would have a problem with the setups you mentioned. I have two in a rack and one on display in a 20g.

Don't forget the tricolors, I wouldn't mind having one myself!

99Vengeur
02-05-2008, 11:41 AM
http://www.hognose.com/

This is a great place to get information regarding all the different species of hognose.

Enjoy!
Robert Charvat

MDC_Ophiuchus
02-05-2008, 02:26 PM
Don't forget about the Madagascar species! There's the giants, the speckleds and the blondes. They do get larger than the other species, though.

ladyserpent7
02-25-2008, 04:45 AM
eastern hogs are the ones that lead more towards the frog diet...westerns do just fine with mice..

whytepizza
06-19-2008, 11:07 AM
I have found the westerns and mexicans to be awesome. I like mexicans because their face is lighter and they look more like a rattler. The westerns are great. My westerns curl so they are half the size they normally are. I had them in a 20l tank but they would stay in one spot and make themselves small, so i keep them in a ten gallon and they are very happy. My mexican is a baby and she is VERY active. For her, i use a 20l, even as a neonate. All their personalities are close (except for one bad egg).
The one downside to a mexican is they will go off feeding occasionally. This isn't bad, but you need to be careful. Usually scenting the pinks with tuna juice works well.
Anyway, they are all awesome. If you can hold them first it'd be great. Most will run away but as soon as you pick them up will either stay very still, or explore your hand, shirt, neck, eyes, etc.
If you want to see their bluff a mexican or eastern is good for that, if you find one who is a 'bad egg.' Most won't do it, but a few here or there do it all the time.

whytepizza
06-19-2008, 11:15 AM
I have found the westerns and mexicans to be awesome. I like mexicans because their face is lighter and they look more like a rattler. The westerns are great. My westerns curl so they are half the size they normally are. I had them in a 20l tank but they would stay in one spot and make themselves small, so i keep them in a ten gallon and they are very happy. My mexican is a baby and she is VERY active. For her, i use a 20l, even as a neonate. All their personalities are close (except for one bad egg).
The one downside to a mexican is they will go off feeding occasionally. This isn't bad, but you need to be careful. Usually scenting the pinks with tuna juice works well.
Anyway, they are all awesome. If you can hold them first it'd be great. Most will run away but as soon as you pick them up will either stay very still, or explore your hand, shirt, neck, eyes, etc.
If you want to see their bluff a mexican or eastern is good for that, if you find one who is a 'bad egg.' Most won't do it, but a few here or there do it all the time.
Aquariums or racks are fine. Temp between 75-85 day temp (and night temp) is good for them too. They are nocturnal, so therefore there is no reason to necessitate a UV light (although it is disputed). I never use a UV light but i have tortoises and turtles and the light from their cage does filter in. Remember, if you use an aquarium the glass is UVA/UVB protective and won't do anything but make it bright and difficult for them to sleep if you use it during the day.
As always, both mexican and western will dig and burrow. They require very little humidity (keep in mind they do dig so the humidity below the surface can reach up to 60%!), are easy to feed, are tough little snakes and can take alot of abuse from climate and poor food choices, and make excellent pets.
Easterns are more difficult. They CANNOT live on just pinks. It creates fatty deposites which will hinder development, digestion, and their immune system. The require much less heat (65-80), require more humidity (50-70%), are not quite as nice, but have gorgeous colors!

John E Dove
06-19-2008, 09:26 PM
Um, Mr. Kilburn,
I can agree with you that UVB is not required for Heterodon nasicus sp., they can assimilate the calcium from their food without it, but they are not nocturnal. They are primarily diurnal in the wild, I see Heterodon nasicus nasicus commonly in my area, and they seldom go below the surface to a depth that provides humidity as high as 60%. In our desert environment they can usually be found on the surface or barely covered in very dry conditions. Our avg humidity ranges at about 20% tops.

whytepizza
06-21-2008, 10:02 AM
Um, Mr. Kilburn,
I can agree with you that UVB is not required for Heterodon nasicus sp., they can assimilate the calcium from their food without it, but they are not nocturnal. They are primarily diurnal in the wild, I see Heterodon nasicus nasicus commonly in my area, and they seldom go below the surface to a depth that provides humidity as high as 60%. In our desert environment they can usually be found on the surface or barely covered in very dry conditions. Our avg humidity ranges at about 20% tops.

You are correct sir! I'm sorry for the confusion. Yes, they are dinural, but are most commonly active during the night in captivity because of the lack of light induced stress (or at least when i am home they are not active). Wild Caught are active all the time.
Humidity, as i said, should be low, but they can burrow up depths that reach 60% humidity, but almost never do. If it is too dry they will let you know by dumping some of their water out, or just plain soaking in their water dish. In the wild they are found near lakes, streams, rock formations (which can retain and filter water naturally), and plant-life. All of these geographical markers retain some moisture so they can adjust the humidity level on their own. Although as Mr. Dove stated, they will hardly, if ever dig that deep in order to get such high levels of humidity, and if they do so frequently there is a problem with the snake.
Easterns are a different matter. They are good swimmers and need fairly high humidity. They are almost always seen in swamps, or by streams (makes it easy to find toads and newts), and are primarily active at night. Once in a while you will find them in forest type areas, but it is very rare unless there is a nice pool of water someplace close.
I live in New Jersey and you can find easterns all over the place (because NJ is a giant swamp). All, (western, easters, and mexicans) wild caught take roughly two years to adjust to captivity. Most mexican and western species you find for sale are captive bred, and therefore need no additional time to adjust to captivity. Around me, most easterns are wild caught. They thrive in my area so noone attempts to breed them. I noticed when i lived in Arizona the reptile shows always had captive bred easterns and a few wild caught mexicans and/or westerns. I think it all depends on location, location, location.
Thank you, Mr. Dove for making sure i give correct information!