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Lucille
09-22-2009, 06:28 AM
Buying crickets from Petco is fast and easy but can get expensive. Ordering crickets online is a much more reasonable way to get crickets, but I've never have luck keeping them around very long. If anyone has kept them for more than a few days without the crickets turning into a heap of dead stinky insects, please post how you do it.

angie.h
09-22-2009, 02:12 PM
Hi Lucille..that's the million dollar question,well for adult crix anyway.Are you having trouble with all sizes or specifically large ones? I have no trouble unless they are 3 quarters or larger.I use a large plastic tote to dump them along with egg-crating for them to hide[ it comes with the shipments]I feed them any veggies that I do the beardies.Just check daily for anything looking moldy.The babies all up to 3/4"do fine,I keep them for weeks.The large ones are the ones that die off but usually takes a week or two.When you set THEM up,put a layer of oatmeal on bottom of toter[ I learned that tip from Gina Gauvin] Sometimes they might die b/c of temp extremes during shipment+ just takes a few days to actually kill them.Hope this helps you....

Lucille
09-22-2009, 07:49 PM
Thanks for the advice, I'll try it. I have been buying petco crickets for a while but New York Worms is running a special on crix over on KS. I've bought from them before and they are really good, crix always arrived hopping. I think maybe I always ordered the big ones, this time I'm trying the half inch size.
How high are your tote sides?

Mooing Tricycle
09-22-2009, 07:52 PM
Get Flukers Orange.

I keep them with this, and they live for quite a long time ( long enough that i use just about all of them up before they die) Not all live, but im going to say 80% of them do.

Lucille
09-22-2009, 08:12 PM
I had to go look it up, lol. Looks like good stuff, hope it is at Petco.

In a moment of insanity, I even thought about breeding crix myself, but fortunately reality interfered and I'm going to try to get the cricket shipments from New York Worms to last at least 3 weeks. Once I finish the living room painting which is majorly interfering with my time to do critter stuff, I have a project involving making some acrylic cube housing for slings, and my fuzzies seem to like crix better than mealworms.

flight_ems
09-22-2009, 09:02 PM
We order from NY Worms(3/4" size) as well and have had very good luck. We do the exact same thing as angie.h except the oatmeal. We keep ours in a rubbermaid-like bin, we cut a piece out of the top and hot glued screen in it's place. It helps with ventilation which helps keep the smell down for about 2 weeks. Then we start to smell it but that's about when we run out again, then we bleach out the tub and let it dry for the next batch. We do the gut load gel chunk type of stuff, we switched kinds now & I think it's Flukers. Also we feed greens & veggies to them.

Lucille
09-22-2009, 09:05 PM
What size bins do y'all use?

angie.h
09-22-2009, 09:10 PM
The totes I use are about 16"high+ about 20 gal.for very small crix. I dump up to 6-7,000 in one tote.The larger crix go in the next size up....every store has lots of different sizes.I give the larger crix more room.We have had the melodious sounds of crickets chirping in our house for the last 16 years...our 2 cats used to catch any escapees but now they're old and they can't be bothered.Not many escape though,even though we don't use the lids and we never see them upstairs.

flight_ems
09-23-2009, 12:01 AM
Ours is probably about 20-30gal and we only keep 1000-2000 @ a time of the 3/4".

DAND
09-23-2009, 05:26 AM
The best tote I have found is the 66 quart Sterilite. It's sides are smooth and the bottom is also with the exception of the outer perimeter. Depending on the size of crickets, it will determine if you need the lid or not. 3/4's to Adult will need the lid to keep them from jumping out. I cut out the majority of the lid and replaced (hot glue is your friend, unless you touch it) it with aluminum screen.

Place the egg crate on one side and the food and water source on the other. Depending on the amount of crickets you will be keeping at a time you will have to do this more often with larger quantities. Remove everything from the tote (except the crickets) and tip the tote to one side. Place the egg crate back on the clean side and the crickets will return to the egg crate. A little prompting with a business card (those plastic ones I keep getting for a pre-approved American Express card work great) while scooping the waste, sheds and dead ones will leave you with a clean tote. Do this every couple days. If they are smelling you need to do it more often. Crickets do not do well when wet and the dead crickets will start to cause too much moisture if not removed. Too much moisture and you have more dying.

The problem with crickets coming from most pet stores is they do not know how to care for them let alone feed them. Potato is not, I repeat NOT a food source. By the time you get them they are half or more starved and chances are is the reason they die off quickly. Chirpers generally have on an average a 14 day life cycle. The problem is you don't know how long they have been chirping prior to you getting them.

Food: If your food (crickets) are healthy your critters will be healthy. I have made up my own special blend of cricket/roach food but I have and deal with a lot of them at once. It is a combination of a number of things including (but not limited to) kitten food, oatmeal and calcium. I grind it all up in the blender and it becomes the consistency of brown sugar. Flaked fish food is a good food source too and if you already have fish it is one less thing to worry about.

Water: I prefer to use carrot over potato or the gel stuff. Do not mist them. They also sell a watering device that is similar they use for chicks but it has a sponge or plastic ring with holes that keeps the crickets from drowning. Open dishes will not work as crickets do not swim well and you'll just end up with some nasty soup. :ack2:

Lucille
09-23-2009, 06:16 AM
Thanks!! I will try to make up some food. I might have a blender around somewhere...
I did not know that their life span was 2 weeks so I won't be too upset if they don't make it to 3 weeks then.

Crix are a lot more trouble than mealies or roaches but it seems to me that Ts really prefer them, mine do anyway. They just were not at all thrilled with mealies.

DAND
09-23-2009, 06:25 AM
Thanks!! I will try to make up some food. I might have a blender around somewhere...
I did not know that their life span was 2 weeks so I won't be too upset if they don't make it to 3 weeks then.

Crix are a lot more trouble than mealies or roaches but it seems to me that Ts really prefer them, mine do anyway. They just were not at all thrilled with mealies.


Clarification: Their life cycle is longer than 2 weeks. When they molt and get the wings they have approximately 2 weeks left before they die. This can vary with temps. The warmer it is the quicker they could died whereas cooler temps could prolong the time they have left.

angie.h
09-23-2009, 09:09 AM
Yes,the large ones die more quickly,and that's what I suspected,they reach the end of their life..thanks Dave.I also wanted to mention that the oatmeal in the bottom should only be used for the larger crickets..the small would disappear and be difficult to wrangle out of the bottom.I also use a flat piece of cardboard to scoop the dead crix,skin sheds+ droppings out.I put some of it in my flower boxes outside and have the best impatiens for miles around.

Lucille
09-23-2009, 08:37 PM
I got a 92 qt sterilite with nice tal sides. There are 2 kinds of lids, usually: the opaque plastic that is pretty easy to cut, and the hard clear plastic that tends to shatter and crack when you cut it. Unfortunately the lid that came with this was hard plastic. I threw it away after it started cracking as I was cutting and I used a glue gun to glue two overlapping pieces of wire (or as they say in Texas, war) screen onto the top. The crickets should arrive tomorrow so we will see....

j walker
09-25-2009, 12:58 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CL935ahb6A&feature=related

Lucille
09-25-2009, 02:35 AM
Thank you, that was an interesting link.

DAND
09-25-2009, 03:07 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CL935ahb6A&feature=related


Good grief. Sorry but no, no, no. :NoNo: If you spray them like shown in the video you will have dead crickets. The reason they "booked" to the paper is they were just sprayed and they were trying to get out of the rain and there wasn't anywhere else for them to go. There was no where for them to hide in the tank except on and behind the wet paper. Put a piece of egg crate in an empty tank and what happens? Right, they will climb on it but the majority will be hiding under it. Lucille and others feel free to try the way in the video but be prepared to need more crickets.

flight_ems
09-25-2009, 03:24 AM
:iagree:

They hydrate from eating veggies and greens. Like I've mentioned earlier we also use the gut load water bites.

Liz

Lucille
09-25-2009, 06:06 AM
The youtube above shows how to take care of them, but from someone who raises crickets. has anyone here actually raised any?

Why is it crickets are so stinky? Roaches and mealies aren't.

Lucille
09-25-2009, 06:08 AM
Lucille and others feel free to try the way in the video but be prepared to need more crickets.

Yeah I think you are right. Cubes and veggies/carrots are good as water sources, but I don't think crickets like to be misted or sprayed.

j walker
09-25-2009, 06:53 AM
Good grief. Sorry but no, no, no. :NoNo: If you spray them like shown in the video you will have dead crickets. The reason they "booked" to the paper is they were just sprayed and they were trying to get out of the rain and there wasn't anywhere else for them to go. There was no where for them to hide in the tank except on and behind the wet paper. Put a piece of egg crate in an empty tank and what happens? Right, they will climb on it but the majority will be hiding under it. Lucille and others feel free to try the way in the video but be prepared to need more crickets. yes if you spray them like that in a bare cage you will have dead crickets but the soil does not give the water a chance to collect , i prefer not to keep crickets but when i do i follow the methods in that and his other video to the letter , i used to keep crickets and i tried several different methods they always died until i started usuing that method , the system works

DAND
09-25-2009, 09:39 AM
Why is it crickets are so stinky? Roaches and mealies aren't.

Wet crickets tend to smell. Death tends to smell. Dead wet crickets tend to smell.

yes if you spray them like that in a bare cage you will have dead crickets but the soil does not give the water a chance to collect , i prefer not to keep crickets but when i do i follow the methods in that and his other video to the letter , i used to keep crickets and i tried several different methods they always died until i started usuing that method , the system works

I have bred and raised crickets from pinheads to adults. I also have been distributing for a cricket company for a few years. Chances are I have dealt with more crickets then the next ten people collectively will ever use. Forward that video to any cricket company and I bet you will not find one that would recommend it's method.

I have had customers ask me "how do I keep my crickets alive?" and I have explained to them how, as I did above and the feedback I have received from them has always been positive. Hell, I have lost money in doing so since they now are able to keep their crickets alive and are not having to purchase them as often.

angie.h
09-25-2009, 09:48 AM
Wet crickets=dead crickets...as Dave said.The ones in the video are surviving b/c of the heat lamp...this is allowing them to dry out.It can probably work for a small amount of crickets as long as the heat lamp is there,and not on a bare floor of a plastic bin or aquarium.Heat lamp can also revive sluggish crix that come in the winter half-frozen.

mharris281
09-25-2009, 11:45 AM
I buy from http://www.millbrookcrickets.com/ they run about $13.00 for 500 and FREE 2 day shipping best price I have found. just for FYI

Lucille
09-25-2009, 07:36 PM
Yeah, but you can get the best price in the world (with their special, my crickets cost half of what you paid, when I got them from New York Worms) but if you can't keep them chirping, it's wasted money.

The crickets arrived to day, bad news and good news. Bad news is that about a thousand fire ants crawled throught the screen and were there in the package at my door. (I shook most of them out). Good news is that the vast majority are still hopping and chirping, and that the suggestions here for getting a cricket container were perfect, none so far have hopped out.

I may just see if they can be delivered to the Fedex place about five miles away and I could pick them up there maybe. These Texas fire ants are something else.

Many thanks to all, for all the great suggestions and advice. Of course, now I am forced to consider buying more Ts since I have lots of crickets :D

SSmith
09-26-2009, 04:15 PM
Some good tips here gonna have to try a few of them myself

offroad537
09-28-2009, 02:07 AM
adults only live about two weeks at the most. buy medium crickets and feed them cricket food and water. its really not that hard.

DAND
09-28-2009, 02:15 AM
adults only live about two weeks at the most. buy medium crickets and feed them cricket food and water. its really not that hard.

And here I have been making it so difficult. Thanks for making this so simple.

Lucille
10-08-2009, 07:27 PM
Thank you everyone for your advice. My crickets are still going strong.

DAND
10-08-2009, 07:46 PM
Thank you everyone for your advice. My crickets are still going strong.

Good to hear!! :thumbsup:

CJFISHES
10-19-2009, 12:56 PM
I've raised crickets.

First you said you were not wanting to raise just keep them alive. I'm not sure what you are asking.

I used to have the same issue of them all dying real fast. Temp unless too cold or too hot *(75 F is perfect) they will survive. I e-mailed several of the cricket farms and they all said the same thing. Only give them corn meal for food. Water for drinking. No fruits or anything else. Crickets cannot live off of a gutload. Gutload before you feed them.

To breed them, put hydrated coco coir in a tub on the warmest side of the bin. If you have gravid females they will do the rest. Take it out in a few days, put it in a good sealed cage/bin, then get it warm to about 80F and they will hatch in 1.5-3 weeks.

ace9916
10-19-2009, 02:05 PM
I currently breed and raise my own crickets for all of my dragons, it took me almost a year in getting it down right. But I know house nearly 15-50,000 crickets at a time depeding on season. For the most part if you want them to grow quicker and healthier keep them at about 90 degrees year round, pin heads adults and eggs alike all do great at this temp. If the temp gets to low you start to have trouble with humidity sticking to the walls of your enclosure and any higher you will cook them. Crickets that smell died from un natural causes poison, they ate each other etc. As for food I give them chicken feed its the cheapest $13 for a 50 pound bag and lasts me about 3 months. For water and mosture i give pin heads moist paper towel, and larger crickets i use a chicken water bowel with a sponge in it to keep them from drowning., When it come to layeing eggs, i use potting soil that you can buy form home depot keep it damp not soaked, and they will lay their eggs. then spray it every so often till they hatch. In what ever enclosure you decide to use make sure to allow as much open hair space as possible so you get less humitty on the inside which will kill any size cricket.