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View Full Version : soooo.... anyone up to helping a newbie?


Dbz4246
11-30-2012, 10:22 PM
Alright, I honestly don't know how to make those really professional looking pics of snakes, you know, the ones with a solid color background, nice sharp looking detail on the snake and no motion what so ever.

So i was wondering if anyone could explain how to do it, and what kind of camera would work for that?

Also, how do you do those lighting techniques to get the color of the snakes or any other reptile really close to the that animals original color?

bigdogg
12-01-2012, 04:52 AM
Well lots of ways to do it. Photo tents or boxes work ok for somethings. Lighting is key having a nice dslr camera with a shoe flash works good or actual photo lights hooked up to camera. I like shoot on flat colors that way no shiny surface for light to reflect. Need a high shutter speed, low white balance, steady hand when taking some. I'm no pro I shoot with an older dslr for my classified photos then there is always editing but I personally shoot raw post raw. As I believe a good photographer shouldnt use editing. As then your only a good photo editer not a photographer

Dbz4246
12-01-2012, 04:44 PM
Thanks for the reply! I looked up some DSLR cameras... and man they are more expensive than I thought they would be. And thanks I will look into those techniques you mentioned.

hhmoore
12-01-2012, 05:28 PM
If you think the DSLRs are expensive, wait until you start pricing decent lenses.
You don't need a DSLR to take good pictures, though; a decent point and shoot can take some outstanding, clear pictures. (Skip the phone pics.) The trick, or part of it, is learning how...and you'll take lots of poor pictures in the process of figuring it out. There is just no substitute for practicing, you have to look at the images with a critical eye - otherwise, you'll just take the same quality pics over and over...getting lucky with a good one every now and then.

Dbz4246
12-01-2012, 05:49 PM
If you think the DSLRs are expensive, wait until you start pricing decent lenses.
You don't need a DSLR to take good pictures, though; a decent point and shoot can take some outstanding, clear pictures. (Skip the phone pics.) The trick, or part of it, is learning how...and you'll take lots of poor pictures in the process of figuring it out. There is just no substitute for practicing, you have to look at the images with a critical eye - otherwise, you'll just take the same quality pics over and over...getting lucky with a good one every now and then.

Thanks! I have a digital point and shoot, but I can't ever get decent pics with it. I'll tinker with it some more, but those higher dollar cameras may have to wait a bit lol. Thanks for yalls input guys

Belfry
01-20-2013, 05:37 AM
How goes the photography? I definitely agree with John & Haraldís advice. Lighting really is the key in it.

1) Less blur means more detail! To avoid the motion blur you need to have plenty of light for a faster shutter speed (A faster shutter speed freezes the action). If use your camera on "auto" you will achieve a faster shutter speed simply by having more light available. Photo tents are nice but you can also rig up your own with dome & clamp lamps and use anything like a sheet, cloth, or paper underneath the snake to create the solid background. When you angle the lamps try to make it so there arenít any harsh shadows. Also be sure not to blind or burn the poor critters by putting it too close!

Natural light is great for taking pictures as well. Another thing to try would be going outside. You can also bring a solid background to put under the snake if you want. Different times of day and different positions (in the sun, in the shade) will produce different results so try a bunch of stuff to see what works best! I personally think dusk and dawn has the best light.

2) You can try this with any camera

3) Sometimes the type of light, especially regular (incandescent) house light bulbs, can make the colors seem off. It can make a "cast" of too orange or too blue. Setting the "white balance" settings yourself usually produces a more nature color than the automatic setting. If you don't know how to set the white balance you can check your camera menu, or manual; they are usually available online. A good way to make sure the colors are right is to point your camera at a white piece of paper (in the light you are using) and try all of the settings until the paper is pure white.

Also feel free to try everything with flash on and off!