African Crested Rat Deadly Poison in it's Fur - FaunaClassifieds
FaunaClassifieds  
 Sponsors »  Breeders | Dealers |  Importers/Exporters | Caging | Feed | Supplies | Services | Events 
  Inside FaunaClassifieds » Product Reviews |  Classifieds!   | Photo Gallery   | Banner Advertising 
 
  Do you want to be able to bump and highlight your classified ads? Click here!

Go Back   FaunaClassifieds > Mammals > General Discussions

Notices

General Discussions This is a general purpose forum open to all topics related to Mammals.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-19-2020, 07:12 PM   #1
JColt
African Crested Rat Deadly Poison in it's Fur

A study has shed new light on a mysterious and rare rodent, confirming a long-held suspicion that the tiny creature's fur is laced with poison.

The study of the African crested rat published Tuesday in the "Journal of Mammology" found the rodent chews a plant-based poison and licks it into specialized hairs in its fur, according to a release from the Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute.

"Its fur is packed with a poison so lethal it can fell an elephant, and just a few milligrams can kill a human," the release says.

There are no known instances of the rats injuring people but there have been reports of dogs becoming ill or dying after attempting to attack the rats, according to a statement from Sara Weinstein, the study's lead author, emailed to USA TODAY.

Petting one would be ill-advised for a number of reasons, Weinstein said.

"Touching their fur would not kill you, although if it's fur on a live crested rat you'd probably get bitten by a very annoyed 2 lb. rodent," the statement said.

If someone got that far, they would want to immediately wash their hands to prevent the poison from coming in contact with their mouth, eyes or any open cuts — that's where the poison could prove deadly, Weinstein said.

The African crested rat is found in eastern Africa and rarely seen by humans, the study says. For those who do encounter it, they'll see a "rabbit-sized rodent" that "resembles a gray puffball crossed with a skunk."

While experts previously believed the creatures were solitary, recorded observations and trapping suggest that the rodents are monogamous and may form family groups.

Observing the elusive rat was a challenge, researchers reported: “Out of 30 traps, we finally got two animals. That was a win. This rat is really rare," the release quotes study co-author Katrina Nyawira.


A study has shed new light on a mysterious and rare rodent, confirming a long-held suspicion that the tiny creature's fur is laced with poison.

The study of the African crested rat published Tuesday in the "Journal of Mammology" found the rodent chews a plant-based poison and licks it into specialized hairs in its fur, according to a release from the Smithsonian’s National Zoo & Conservation Biology Institute.


"Its fur is packed with a poison so lethal it can fell an elephant, and just a few milligrams can kill a human," the release says.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

There are no known instances of the rats injuring people but there have been reports of dogs becoming ill or dying after attempting to attack the rats, according to a statement from Sara Weinstein, the study's lead author, emailed to USA TODAY.

Petting one would be ill-advised for a number of reasons, Weinstein said.

"Touching their fur would not kill you, although if it's fur on a live crested rat you'd probably get bitten by a very annoyed 2 lb. rodent," the statement said.

If someone got that far, they would want to immediately wash their hands to prevent the poison from coming in contact with their mouth, eyes or any open cuts — that's where the poison could prove deadly, Weinstein said.

The African crested rat is found in eastern Africa and rarely seen by humans, the study says. For those who do encounter it, they'll see a "rabbit-sized rodent" that "resembles a gray puffball crossed with a skunk."

While experts previously believed the creatures were solitary, recorded observations and trapping suggest that the rodents are monogamous and may form family groups.

Observing the elusive rat was a challenge, researchers reported: “Out of 30 traps, we finally got two animals. That was a win. This rat is really rare," the release quotes study co-author Katrina Nyawira.

The source of the poison, as observed by researchers: the “African poison arrow tree,” — a plant often used to create arrow poisons.
 
Old 11-19-2020, 08:50 PM   #2
Socratic Monologue
Link to the story:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...dy/6342006002/

There's a pic of the rat in the article -- cute little guy. Almost makes you want to pet it. Almost.
 
Old 11-20-2020, 04:25 PM   #3
JColt
oops, forgot link. Thanks John!
 

Join now to reply to this thread or open new ones for your questions & comments! FaunaClassifieds.com is the largest online community about Reptile & Amphibians, Snakes, Lizards and number one classifieds service with thousands of ads to look for. Registration is open to everyone and FREE. Click Here to Register!

 
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
African Crested Porcupine themighty Mammals For Sale/Wanted Ads 0 12-08-2017 01:26 PM
Why poison frogs don't poison themselves RSS_news Herps In The News 0 09-21-2017 04:40 PM
African Crested Porcupine affordablereptiles Mammals For Sale/Wanted Ads 1 02-27-2017 12:13 PM
Deadly fungus threatens African frogs RSS_news Herps In The News 0 05-06-2016 11:20 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:30 PM.







TESTING!
Fauna Top Sites


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Page generated in 0.05430198 seconds with 12 queries
Content copyrighted ©2002-2018, FaunaClassifieds, LLC