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Old 07-23-2003, 02:45 AM   #1
Adamanteus
Maryland state law issues

State Homepage - http://www.state.md.us/

State Legislature - http://www.mlis.state.md.us/

State Statutes/Code - http://www.mlis.state.md.us/cgi-win/web_statutes.exe
 
Old 01-10-2005, 02:18 PM   #2
areptileguy
MD will be Next!

ADVERTISEMENT
FROM HSUS

Animal Advocates in Maryland: Animals Need Your
Help

Dear Animal Advocate:

Please join The Humane Society of the United States for a
meeting on how you can make a tremendous difference for animals in
Maryland. Your voice, and that of your neighbors, friends and
relatives, has the power to enact laws that will improve the
protection for animals in this state. With this in mind, we invite
you to join us at one of our two "Maryland Legislative Agenda"
meetings, each in a different part of the state to make it easier
for you to attend (details are attached). The legislators in your
district are in key positions to advance critical legislation for
the animals, and we want you to know the most effective ways in
which to communicate your message to them.

In the meetings we will provide you with a basic "lobby 101" for
citizen activists, and discuss some of the bills that will be
introduced in the 2005 session. A quick summary of some of those
bills include:

Legislation to Stop the Bear hunting: The administration held
its first bear hunt in fifty years this fall, killing twenty bears
and sadly the first reported death was a ninth month old cub. This
hunt ended a half of century of protection for Maryland's black
bears. However, current estimates indicate that there are less than
400 bears in the state and these bears face threats from development
and habitat fragmentation and intensive hunting in bordering states,
in addition to being among the slowest mammals to reproduce. Last
years hunt was misguided and unnecessary, and legislation will be
introduced to require legislative approval for any future bear hunts.

Prohibition on Exotic Wildlife as Pets: While exotic wild animals
may appear cute and cuddly while young, but they often grow to be
larger, stronger, and more dangerous than owners expect or can
manage. Disease and parasites that they carry can be dangerous to
human health, and recognizing animal illnesses is often difficult.
Providing appropriate and humane care requires considerable
expertise, specialized facilities, and total dedication. This is
very difficult for the average pet owner, and the animals invariably
suffer because of it. All too often the life of a wild pet is
miserable, languishing in a back yard cage or garage, or circling
endlessly in a small cage or aquarium. Legislation will be
introduced to strengthen address the private possession of certain
wild animals.

Intensive Confinement of Pregnant Pigs: On just a handful of
factory farms in Maryland, pregnant pigs (the "breeding stock") are
kept in 2ft x 7ft metal crates (commonly called gestation crates)
for almost 4 months at a time (the entire length of each pregnancy).
They are moved to another cage to have their piglets, only to be
inseminated again and put back in the tiny crate for the duration of
the next pregnancy. This cycle can go on for up to five years,
forcing pigs to spend at least 80% of their lives unable to turn
around or take more than a step forward or backward. A bill to
mandate more room for these animals was narrowly defeated last year,
and will be reintroduced.

Your involvement is crucial to passing these bills, and
fortunately, very little of your time is required. Some people
think, "No, I'm not that kind of person -- I'm just not political"
or "I don't know anything about legislation or these issues, so I
better not go." But PLEASE, come to a meeting. ANY person who cares
about animals at all is needed and it doesn't matter one bit if
you've never been involved in legislation or politics before. It's
easy to make a difference for the animals. We need everyone to be a
part of this effort! Please attend one of these meetings to learn
about animal protection bills, meet other animal advocates in your
area, and discuss the best ways to convey your message to
legislators.

We hope to see you there as we come together to make 2005 a
positive year for the animals!

Andrea Kozil
Grassroots
Coordinator
Julie Janovsky
Senior State Legislative Specialist




ANIMAL PROTECTION ACTIVIST MEETINGS

Monday, January 10th 7 PM until 8:30
Davis Community Library
6400 Democracy Blvd
Bethesda, MD 20817
240-777-0922

OR
 
Old 03-12-2005, 04:05 AM   #4
chuckster
Maryland Senate Bill 296 Hearing on 3/15 at 1 p.m.

undefinedHerpers Unite!
If you don't know about this exotic animal bill, you should check it out. If
you have gilas or caimans it affects you directly -- if you are a herper
without those animals it still affects you. The HSUS (Humane Society of the
United States)is trying to slowly phase out ALL herps as pets. They are
behind this bill. You probably know all about the new law in New York -- if
you don't -- they have outlawed many exotic pets including large
non-venomous snakes. HSUS was behind that too.
The hearing is 3/15 at 1:00 p.m. at the Miller Senate Office Building, 11
Bladen St., Annapolis, Maryland. Here is the web page:
http://mlis.state.md.us/2005rs/billfile/sb0296.htm
if you want to look for yourself.
Several people are going to testify, but the more people we have, the
better!
Parking is horrible there, however, there is a shuttle that goes from Navy
Stadium (not sure if that's what it's called)and is right on Rowe Blvd. The
shuttle takes you into the state house area. It's free.
I think it's important that herpers are better.
If you can't go -- spread the word and maybe a friend of yours can go. The
bigger presence we have there, the better. Even if you don't live in
Maryland -- but do business in Maryland -- you can help.
______

Visit www.reptileinfo.com, the official site of the Mid-Atlantic Reptile
Show.
 
Old 03-12-2005, 04:14 AM   #5
chuckster
Herpers Unite!
If you don't know about this exotic animal bill, you should check it out. If
you have gilas or caimans it affects you directly -- if you are a herper
without those animals it still affects you. The HSUS (Humane Society of the
United States)is trying to slowly phase out ALL herps as pets. They are
behind this bill. You probably know all about the new law in New York -- if
you don't -- they have outlawed many exotic pets including large
non-venomous snakes. HSUS was behind that too.
The hearing is 3/15 at 1:00 p.m. at the Miller Senate Office Building, 11
Bladen St., Annapolis, Maryland. Here is the web page:
http://mlis.state.md.us/2005rs/billfile/sb0296.htm
if you want to look for yourself.
Several people are going to testify, but the more people we have, the
better!
Parking is horrible there, however, there is a shuttle that goes from Navy
Stadium (not sure if that's what it's called)and is right on Rowe Blvd. The
shuttle takes you into the state house area. It's free.
I think it's important that herpers are better.
If you can't go -- spread the word and maybe a friend of yours can go. The
bigger presence we have there, the better. Even if you don't live in
Maryland -- but do business in Maryland -- you can help.
______

Visit www.reptileinfo.com, the official site of the Mid-Atlantic Reptile
Show
 
Old 04-15-2005, 09:51 PM   #6
chuckster
Well the HSUS didn't succeed here in Maryland.The bill SB-296 was withdrawn.Thanks to all the people who showed up and voiced their concerns.Their expertise was much needed to stop this bill.I would also like to thank our elected officials here in the state of Maryland.I strongly suggest that herpers unite in their home states and fight the HSUS on these issues. Chuck Sasscer
 
Old 12-28-2005, 05:10 AM   #7
Clay Davenport
Well, it looks like the Maryland herpers may have to take up the fight again next year. Here's a news article I found on the subject.
Apparently Jim Rapp and the Humane Society are determined to bring it up again, btu at least one of the previous sponsors said he probably wouldn't be pushing it a second time.

Exotic pet debate likely to face lawmakers again next year

SALISBURY, Md. This alligator is almost cute, just about a foot long with wide baby eyes and a teeny jaw that looks like it could hardly manage a carrot. It's what the alligator will become in a few years as long as a small car with a fearsome bite that landed it with Jim Rapp.

Rapp is director of the Salisbury Zoo, where this juvenile gator was sent along with other exotic animals seized by state officials from their owners. Rapp and other animal advocates are pushing for lawmakers to tighten Maryland's rules on what animals can be kept as pets, saying the Internet and animal programs on TV have caused an explosion of people acquiring exotic animals.

"Go on the Internet and search for 'tiger cub.' You can find one to buy," Rapp said. "Some people don't want to go get a dog or a cat at the pound. They want an exotic, wild animal."

Maryland already calls some pets off-limits except to licensed handlers, including large cats, venomous snakes and the alligator, which was found in a Salisbury pet shop.

But a proposal last year in the General Assembly to expand pet laws to ban more animals, including small primates and more snakes, sputtered amid opposition from exotic animal lovers who say the government shouldn't tell people what pets they can have.

"I think that if you have the space and you have the money and you have the knowledge, then you should be able to keep what you want to keep," said Holli Friedland of Baltimore, who works with a reptile and amphibian rescue group and has opposed the exotic pet bill.

The bill, which sponsors say will be considered again next session, highlighted an animal rights divide many pet owners have never heard of. Wildlife authorities concede they have no idea how many exotic or wild animals Marylanders may be keeping as pets, and the bill brought to Annapolis dozens of exotic pet fans that lawmakers didn't know existed.

"I didn't realize there were private parties, untrained individuals, who were keeping animals who were really unreliable as a household pet," said the bill's sponsor, Delegate Pauline Menes, D-Prince George's.

Both sides are gearing up for another fight over exotic pets. The group that originally suggested the bill, the Humane Society of the United States, sent its director of captive wildlife protection to Annapolis during the interim to persuade lawmakers to pass it. At that hearing, the room was brimming with exotic animal lovers who oppose the idea.

"You cannot be messing around with things like lions, tigers, bears, primates and just hope for the best. Someone's going to hurt," said the Humane Society director, Richard Farinato, who works at a Texas sanctuary for discarded or dangerous exotic pets.

Farinato and other supporters say exotic pets could hurt their owners or escape and maul strangers. They say wild animals are improperly cared for and are sometimes mistreated in the hands of untrained owners. Bill supporters also cite the possibility of exotic pets, especially pet monkeys, spreading disease to humans.

"We don't know what the next exotic disease is that may jump from primate to human," Rapp said. Farinato said some monkeys carry hepatitis B.

He also pointed to a monkeypox outbreak in 2003 that sickened more than 70 people in the Midwest with blisters and a rash that resembles smallpox as a cause for concern. In that case, the illness was spread by prairie dogs after they were infected by imported African rodents at a pet distribution center.

To Richard Hahn, director of the Catoctin Wildlife Preserve and Zoo in Thurmont, the fears of animal attacks or disease outbreaks are exaggerated. He doesn't keep any exotic animals as pets and as a licensed animal exhibitor, he wouldn't be affected by the bill but he pointed out that far more people are hurt by dogs than by exotic pets.

"This is something that is much ado about nothing," Hahn said.

Opponents have also taken issue with how the pet ban would be enforced. Animals on the banned pet list could be seized without a warrant. Hahn and others have complained that animal control workers may not be trained to recognize banned animals.

"Let's say someone looks into your window and they see a cat, and they think it's a big cat, something they think is on the list. They could then break into your house and take the cat. That's not right," Hahn said.

The concerns have led to a revised bill, which includes fewer animals than the Humane Society originally hoped to ban. The proposal still includes a provision allowing for the seizure of animals, though, something Rapp said is necessary if the ban is to work.

"Somebody has to have the authority to deal with these animals," he said. "If you violate this law, an officer should be able to confiscate the animal."

Not everyone is sure a compromise can be worked out. A senator who joined the bill as a sponsor last session, Democrat Norman Stone of Baltimore County, said he's unlikely to push the measure again.

"Reaction was fairly strong," he said. "No matter what we did, nobody was satisfied on the committee" that considered the ban.

Menes warned that a wild pet is bound to injure somebody if lawmakers don't act.

"I just think that the position of the average citizen as to whether they feel comfortable with the knowledge that their neighbor now can own these exotic pets and they could be exposed to possible danger, they would want this bill," she said.

Link
 
Old 02-07-2007, 12:10 AM   #8
areptileguy
Baltimore MD notice

http://baltimorehealth.org/press/200...AnimalRegs.pdf

Comments on the rules should be sent to Assistant Commissioner Olivia Farrow at Environmental Health, 210 Guilford Ave., second floor, Baltimore 21202, or by e-mail to olivia.farrow@baltimorecity.gov.

------

they're looking to ban snakes over 5'
green iguanas under 30 inches and over 5'
and ALL scorpions and tarantulas


they're looking at a $80 lifetime permit for people with pigeons and pigs, but not for herps/inverts!
 

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