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Old 08-16-2019, 09:29 AM   #1
bcr229
Florida doubles efforts to hunt invasive pythons

https://www.apnews.com/c7c9a2f356864382844692033cb8c3a8

Florida doubles efforts to hunt invasive pythons

By KELLI KENNEDYAugust 7, 2019

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Standing in front of a hissing, squirming 12-foot-long python Wednesday, Gov. Ron DeSantis said he’s doubling resources to remove the invasive species that’s destroying the natural food chain in Florida’s delicate Everglades.

The state has been paying select hunters to catch and kill the invasive snakes on state lands since March 2017. It even hosts a popular python hunt for the public every three years in an attempt to control the tens of thousands of pythons that are estimated to be slithering through the Everglades. Scientists say the giant constrictor snakes, which can grow over 20 feet (6 meters) long, have eliminated 99% of the native mammals in the Everglades, decimating food sources for native predators such as panthers and alligators.

More than 3,000 pythons have been removed from the Everglades since 2017, not counting the reptiles removed by the public in python hunts, according to wildlife officials. But those efforts have not been enough, experts said Wednesday.

DeSantis said Florida will double its resources for python removal and that the state Department of Environmental Protection and the Department of Agriculture have a new agreement to begin hunting pythons in 130,000 acres (52,610 hectares) of state parks. But the governor’s staff did not immediately answer questions about how much the stepped-up efforts would cost or where the state funds were being allocated from.

“They’ve threatened endangered species. They’ve decimated other animal populations ... there’s no natural predators for these. They can eat small alligators even,” the governor said, jokingly asking the snake wranglers to take a few steps back from the podium where he was speaking.

The 12-foot (3.6-meter) python next to him weighed about 50 pounds (23 kg) and is around 7 years old. It’s distinct black and gold markings glimmered more prominently than usual because it had just shed its skin. Behind the governor, loud airboats roared their engines as they took tourists through the tall grass of the protected swampland known as the Everglades.

Next to the massive reptile, Tom Rahill of the South Florida Water Management District, held a restless baby python that he caught on the side of the road the night before.

The governor’s announcement comes at a crucial time for the species — hatchling season.

“A 16-foot (4.9-meter) python could have 60, 65 babies running around. The population just explodes,” said Rahill.

DeSantis said the U.S. Department of the Interior is also stepping in to get snake hunters to remote areas of Big Cypress National Preserve they’ve previously been unable to access, but details of that program were still in the works.

Burmese pythons were brought to South Florida as pets in the late 1970s. They were released into the wild and have devastated native populations of bobcats, opossums, raccoons and foxes and have nearly wiped out cottontail rabbits.

The state is also looking for the public’s help in catching the invasive reptiles, noting plans to make the python hunt a yearly event and asking tourists, boaters, hunters and hikers to aid in the daily removal if they have the expertise.
 
Old 08-16-2019, 02:08 PM   #2
Socratic Monologue
Though I don't know if I could handle too much of the killing part (I eliminate lots of varmints from our property, but like most of us here I would have a hard time killing a snake), I would enjoy trying to catch them. I'm a rank amateur field herper, though, so I'd probably be an utter failure at it, and likely get injured in the process.

It is sad that we can wipe out species without trying, but we can't seem to even slow down invasives.
 
Old 08-22-2019, 03:19 AM   #3
STUART
What a load of bull....

LOL well I guess they wont need to do too much work in illiminating the Burms from the Everglades, since they (the pythons) according to scientists have now eaten 99% of their food source lol. Guess they will starve to death now. Do these scientists even think before they open their mouths? 100s of baby pythons will now morph into grass eating animals cause there is nothing left to eat. Oh brother. In other news Florida is being bulldozed at a rate never before seen to put up subdivisions and condos.
 

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