Florida state law issues

My husband is at a point in his career where we could end up at almost any state in the country in the next 6-18 months. He just recently got a callback from Florida. I own leopard geckos, crested geckos, ball pythons, and will be receiving a boa constrictor soon. I understand that the Boa constrictor and its subspecies are not presently banned but there is pressure to add them.

However I will be breeding crested geckos and ball pythons 1-5 years from now. And very possibly boas even further down the line provided they are not severely restricted or banned. So...my understanding is that my current pets fall under Class III wildlife since they are not Class I or II. I don't need a permit to POSSESS them, correct? However if I sell my animals and want to be totally legal I'll need another permit(Class III Commercial Permit)? Can anyone link me to this permit? So far I've only been able to find the FL permit for conditional reptiles and that's not what I'm looking for.
 
The only boas that you need permits for at the moment are Green/Yellow anacondas. Everything else you have is completely legal for you to keep in Florida without any permits.
 
just a quick question what class licenses do you need to sell non venomous reptiles in FL
 
FWC Bans Anacondas, Other Exotic Species, as Pets

http://www.fox13news.com/news/florida-news/fwc-has-banned-floridians-from-having-pet-anacondas-other-exotic-species

FWC has banned Floridians from having pet anacondas, other exotic species
By FOX 13 News staff

Posted Feb 22 2019 06:49AM EST
Updated Feb 25 2019 04:52AM EST

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (FOX 13) - Any Floridian who wanted to own a pet anaconda has missed an opportunity to do so after wildlife officials banned them as pets.

Anacondas are not native to the Sunshine State, but they can and wildlife officials believe they can cause economic and environmental harm, and threaten human safety. During a Thursday meeting, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission voted unanimously on a list of animals banned from private ownership, or breeding them for commercial use.

The move is meant to prevent populations of "high-risk" species from growing in Florida, according to Carli Segelson, a spokesperson for FWC.

"It costs much less to prevent a species from becoming established than it does to control them once they are here. Our focus is on prevention so that we can stop another species from becoming established here," she explained to FOX 13.

FWC decided to specifically add yellow anacondas, Beni anacondas, and Deschauensee’s anacondas to the state's "Prohibited List." People who already have the specific species as pets have been "grandfathered in" and can keep them. They are just required to obtain a no-cost permit.

Segelson said anacondas have always been recognized as non-natives to Florida. They may have been added to the list of banned pets, but they were already on a separate list -- on the federal level.

"These species were already listed as injurious by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service," she said. "A federal law known as the Lacey Act prohibited interstate transport of injurious wildlife, unless permitted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. However, in April 2017, a court ruling removed federal oversight of interstate transport, resulting in potential importation of injurious species into Florida."

FWC said breeders have 90 days to get rid of their inventory. Other non-native species that were added to the list include:

Mammals
Meerkats/mongoose
Raccoon dog
Dhole
Brushtail possum
Flying foxes

Birds
Red-whiskered bul-bul
Dioch
Java sparrow
Pink starling

Reptiles
Brown tree snake

FWC's Nonnative Fish and Wildlife Program operates to remove these types of species that can threaten Florida's ecosystem. Anyone who spots any invasive species are asked to call FWC’s Exotic Species Hotline at 888-483-4681.
 
https://myfwc.com/about/commission/commission-meetings/february-2021/

Meeting was yesterday, agenda item #5 to prohibit possession, breeding, and sale of the following species passed: Burmese pythons, reticulated pythons, scrub pythons, Northern African pythons, Southern African Pythons, amethystine pythons, green anacondas, Nile monitor lizards, tegus (all species) and green iguanas.
 
So, where is the SPCA (or all the other animal hugging associations) when it comes to issues related to reptiles? Can you imagine the uproar if this was some jack booted thugs killing cats or dogs and obviously enjoying their handiwork?

Honestly had that been my facility with those goons killing my animals, there might not have been just reptile blood on that floor. Just looking at that SOB smiling while standing over his handiwork makes my blood boil. I would NOT and WILL not recognize anyone's authority, no matter who it is granted by, to kill my animals or damage my property in any way. Destruction of private property does not become permissible just because someone is wearing a tin badge while engaging in that activity.

What the hell has gone bat sh!t crazy mentally defective in LEO agents these days? People think that just because they get a badge pinned to their chest that they have become some kind of godlings able to just trample over people's rights at will?

BTW, I remember when I retired my SerpenCo business. FWC came swooping in here, I guess thinking the reason I was getting out of the business was because I had some banned species and they wanted to catch me with them before I could get rid of them. Sure was a disappointing day for them when all they found were my corn snakes. I am surprised some idiot didn't try to claim they were pygmy versions of pythons or some such nonsense they can dream up just to be able to write up a factless citation.

And all the above is IMHO.
 
So, where is the SPCA (or all the other animal hugging associations) when it comes to issues related to reptiles? Can you imagine the uproar if this was some jack booted thugs killing cats or dogs and obviously enjoying their handiwork?

Honestly had that been my facility with those goons killing my animals, there might not have been just reptile blood on that floor. Just looking at that SOB smiling while standing over his handiwork makes my blood boil. I would NOT and WILL not recognize anyone's authority, no matter who it is granted by, to kill my animals or damage my property in any way. Destruction of private property does not become permissible just because someone is wearing a tin badge while engaging in that activity.

What the hell has gone bat sh!t crazy mentally defective in LEO agents these days? People think that just because they get a badge pinned to their chest that they have become some kind of godlings able to just trample over people's rights at will?

BTW, I remember when I retired my SerpenCo business. FWC came swooping in here, I guess thinking the reason I was getting out of the business was because I had some banned species and they wanted to catch me with them before I could get rid of them. Sure was a disappointing day for them when all they found were my corn snakes. I am surprised some idiot didn't try to claim they were pygmy versions of pythons or some such nonsense they can dream up just to be able to write up a factless citation.

And all the above is IMHO.
These are not wildlife agents or game wardens anymore just bad cops. And these scumbags want to come into peoples homes and inspect their childrens pet cornsnake enclosure. THAT IS THE PLAN AS OF KNOW. However this media attention might make them change their plans
 
Sphaerodactylus notatus notatus

FWC listing the FL reef gecko.

https://myfwc.com/media/40djhgfu/5b-rl-floridareefgecko.pdf

https://myfwc.com/media/1f0dssnz/5b-presentation-floridareefgecko.pdf

From USARK FL:
https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=805087748434009&set=a.525880469688073

FWC Commissioners have voted to make the Reef Gecko (Sphaerodactylus notatus notatus) a Candidate Species for state listing. This was a final rule vote that was not preceeded by a draft rule vote and period for public input. As of the May 1 vote, legal wild collection was immediately ended with no due process or assessment of economic impact by FWC. FWC did not reach out to USARK FL to assess the impact that listing or making this a candidate species for listing would have on industry.

In 2019, Stephanie Clements and Christopher Searcy of University of Miami requested a biological status review by FWC to consider the Reef gecko for state listing. "New scientific evidence indicates that this species may in fact be declining across South Florida, and faces threats from habitat loss and climate change," said Clement and Searcy.

Unfortunately, no protection of habitat is inherent to protections for state listed species, as evidenced by the rampant destruction of State Threatened Florida pine snake habitat. As with most state listed species, there is no prescribed survey requirement or relocation procedure.

Based on previous precedent, state listing would likely result in banning keeping and breeding of this species. As with other listed herp species, state listing of the Reef Gecko is unlikely to lead to significant habitat protections.

The account on the Reef Gecko in the book "Amphibians and Reptiles of Florida," co-authored by Dr. Kenney Krysko, retired FWC herp biologist Paul Moler, and current FWC herp biologist Kevin Enge, considers this species to be nonnative in Florida. State listing of a nonnative species as "Threatened" would be an unprecedented step for FWC.
 
Here's probably the paper that underpins this move:

Clements, Stephanie & Powell, Emily & Mothes, Caitlin & Searcy, Christopher. (2021). Assessing the conservation risk of Sphaerodactylus notatus, the U.S. herpetofaunal species most vulnerable to sea level rise. Biodiversity and Conservation. 30. 10.1007/s10531-020-02080-9.

Meshaka et al, in "Exotic Amphibians and Reptiles of the United States" (2022), consider Sphaerodactylus notatus to be native to Florida.

Apparently there is genetic data to suggest that the invasive hypothesis (that the species entered the US through shipping to Key West around the early-middle 19th century) is not correct: " The U.S. reptile most at risk from rising seas is one you likely haven’t heard of.

The book "Amphibians and Reptiles of Florida" was published in 2019, and should not be expected to take precedence over newer data. The implication (by USARK; not the report of this implication in this thread) that this text would be authoritative seems disingenuous.

None of what I point out here is supposed to mean that I think listing it would be a net benefit, of course.
 
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